The Catcher

Ever notice the catcher in a baseball game? He’s the one crouching down, ever watchful. A very important part of the equation, isn’t he? What a position! Pretty defensive, but, when the need arises he can be very offensive as he plays hard for his team. He catches that runner as he rounds third plate and heads toward home at full steam, before he can reach his goal of scoring a point!

white and red baseball player with black face helmet and brown leather mitts

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Let’s take a closer look. When he enters the field and takes his position at the bottom of home plate, he is present for the first and last events of the game shall we say, the runs coming in and strike outs at the plate. He is properly dressed for the job with hat,  face mask, chest protector, leg guards, catcher’s mitt and cleated shoes that dig in to hold his position.

When we think about life, we could compare ourselves to a baseball catcher. No, really, we are given by our “manufacturer” all the equipment we need to be able to handle our “position.” But, what if our equipment becomes compromised? What happens then?

Suppose our  hat has been blown off by a particularly strong storm, an emotional event that took us by surprise. We may feel uncovered, vulnerable with our thoughts a bit muddied or dusty from the stray debris that has been deposited on our mind. Is our perception clear? Can our vision actually be affected and distorted because we are wearing a face mask that has became bent and broken during an unforeseen accident that pitched us forward onto some hard ground?  Let’s continue looking.

Hurt and abuse may have damaged our chest protector leaving our heart bleeding and torn. The protective cushioning that was originally placed there by the “manufacturer” has become damaged and ineffective.

Constantly tripping up and making mistakes can be the result of leaving our leg guards behind when entering dangerous territory. Because of our muddied thinking, we may have become forgetful and not mindful of what we need to don for our daily walk. And how are we to handle things? Reaching out spontaneously to touch what may be forbidden will leave us burnt, hurt and often disfigured with our mitt soiled and torn.

Lastly, where are we going? Are we wearing our protective foot covering when traversing through life? Abuse and injury, either by someone else, life’s circumstances or our own doing can lead us to a place of confusion and pain. Often touching others with that same harmful behavior.

Even though this is just an analogy, we can feel like that beat up catcher who  has has his protective gear destroyed. We know that our loving Father has sent us here to be part of his world, his Kingdom. But, the events of life can surely take us on many different roads, some being very difficult to trek. Jesus told us that in this life we would have trouble. Sometimes I think, “well, thanks Jesus!” But, he also said to be of good cheer because He overcame the world. Sigh of relief. He has already done this! The work is finished!

He is the one who can lead us back to wholeness. Whatever that may look like for each of us. Perhaps a straightened gait or cleared mind, or sharper vision with thoughts that bring joy. Broken hearts can be made whole when they are placed into His hands that His word tells us, have been engraved with our very names.

For sure, this may not be easy, it may be extremely difficult to turn our faces toward His. Hurt and unbelief and lies all seem to be clouding our vision. But he is also there to help us. Just one glance in His direction can turn our perspective in a thousand different ways. His ways are higher than ours He says. Taking that first step in our dirty and worn out shoes will lead us to the path of healing and freedom. He asks us, to “come.”  He will restore our “equipment” and help us move on to take our position, bend down, dig in and get the work done. Lastly and most importantly, finish the game well!

Ephesians 6, Hebrews 12, Philippians 3

baseball player in gray and black uniform running

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